History

Books and the British Army in the Age of the American Revolution

Books and the British Army in the Age of the American Revolution

Author: Ira D. Gruber

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807899403

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 867

Historians have long understood that books were important to the British army in defining the duties of its officers, regulating tactics, developing the art of war, and recording the history of campaigns and commanders. Now, in this groundbreaking analysis, Ira D. Gruber identifies which among over nine hundred books on war were considered most important by British officers and how those books might have affected the army from one era to another. By examining the preferences of some forty-two officers who served between the War of the Spanish Succession and the French Revolution, Gruber shows that by the middle of the eighteenth century British officers were discriminating in their choices of books on war and, further, that their emerging preference for Continental books affected their understanding of warfare and their conduct of operations in the American Revolution. In their increasing enthusiasm for books on war, Gruber concludes, British officers were laying the foundation for the nineteenth-century professionalization of their nation's officer corps. Gruber's analysis is enhanced with detailed and comprehensive bibliographies and tables.
Military history

Army History

Army History

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UIUC:30112099060896

Category: Military history

Page:

View: 532

Biography & Autobiography

Renegade Revolutionary

Renegade Revolutionary

Author: Phillip Papas

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814767658

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 410

View: 512

Charles Lee, a former British army officer turned revolutionary, was one of the earliest advocates for American independence. Papas shows that few American revolutionaries shared Lee's radical political outlook, and his confidence that the American Revolution could be won primarily by the militia (or irregulars) rather than a centralized regular army.
History

Whispers Across the Atlantick

Whispers Across the Atlantick

Author: David Smith

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472827968

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 741

General William Howe was the commander-in-chief of the British forces during the early campaigns of the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). Howe evoked passionate reactions in the people he worked with – his men loved him, his second-in-command detested him, his enemies feared him, his political masters despaired of him. There was even a plot to murder him, in which British officers as well as Americans were implicated. Howe's story includes intrigue, romance and betrayal, played out on the battlefields of North America and concluding in a courtroom at the House of Commons, where Howe defended his decisions with his reputation and possibly his life on the line. The inquiry, complete with witness testimonies and savage debate between the bitterly divided factions of the British Parliament, gives Howe's story the flavour of a courtroom drama. Using extensive research and recent archival discoveries, this book tells the thrilling story of the man who always seemed to be on the verge of winning the American Revolutionary War for Britain, only to repeatedly fail to deliver the final blow.
History

The Men Who Lost America

The Men Who Lost America

Author: Andrew O'Shaughnessy

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781780742472

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 753

The first book to redress the myth of British incompetence during the American Revolution, revealing a unique account of the Empire’s most stunning loss In 1781 the British Empire suffered its most devastating defeat in a war that most believed Britain ought to have won. Common wisdom has held that incompetent military commanders and political leaders in London must have been to blame, their arrogant confidence and outdated tactics proving no match for the innovative and determined Americans. But this is far from the truth. Weaving together the personal stories of ten prominent men who directed the British dimension of the war, Andrew O’Shaughnessy dispels the myths, emerging with a very different and much richer account of the conflict – one driven by able and at times even brilliant leadership. In interlinked biographical chapters, O’Shaughnessy follows the course of the war from the perspectives of King George III, Prime Minister Lord North, military leaders including General Burgoyne, the Earl of Sandwich, and others whose stories shed new light upon our understanding of how the war unfolded. Victories were frequent, and in fact the British conquered every American city at some stage of the Revolutionary War, retaining key strongholds even during the peace negotiations. Taking a wider lens to events, O’Shaughnessy looks past the surrender at Yorktown to British victories against the French and Spanish, demonstrating that, ultimately, many of the men who lost America would go on to save the empire.
History

West Point History of the American Revolution

West Point History of the American Revolution

Author: The United States Military Academy

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781476782768

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 887

This is the definitive concise military history of the Revolutionary War and the fourth volume in the West Point History of Warfare series is packed with essential images, exclusive tactical maps, and expert analysis commissioned by The United States Military Academy at West Point to teach the art of war to West Point cadets. The United States Military Academy at West Point is the gold standard for military history and the operational art of war, and has created military history texts for its cadets since 1836. Now, for the first time in more than forty years, the Academy has authorized a new series on the subject that will bear the name West Point. The first three volumes of the West Point History of Warfare released to the public have received rave reviews (and an Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Award) for their “superbly written” texts and their extraordinary maps, images, and data visualizations. The West Point History of the American Revolution is the last volume in this series of definitive concise military histories. Before it was a military academy, West Point was the most important fortress of the American Revolutionary War. Cadets at the Academy learn about the War of Independence in their “History of the Military Art” course, and now this text is available to the public so everyone can understand the birth of the United States Army, the military leadership of Generals George Washington and Nathanael Greene, and the failed British strategies that shaped the conflict. Award-winning military historians Samuel J. Watson, Edward Lengel, and Stephen Conway explain the military and political background to the war and its immediate causes, conduct, and consequences. Concise narrative and lucid analysis are complemented by an impressive array of artworks, contemporary cartoons, excerpts from participants’ letters and memoirs, and dozens of full-color maps prepared under the direction of West Point military historians. Authoritative, illuminating, and beautiful, The West Point History of the American Revolution belongs in the library of every serious student of the American Revolution.
History

The Men Who Lost America

The Men Who Lost America

Author: Andrew Jackson O'Shaughnessy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300195248

Category: History

Page: 497

View: 113

Questioning popular belief, a historian and re-examines what exactly led to the British Empire’s loss of the American Revolution. The loss of America was an unexpected defeat for the powerful British Empire. Common wisdom has held that incompetent military commanders and political leaders in Britain must have been to blame, but were they? This intriguing book makes a different argument. Weaving together the personal stories of ten prominent men who directed the British dimension of the war, historian Andrew O’Shaughnessy dispels the incompetence myth and uncovers the real reasons that rebellious colonials were able to achieve their surprising victory. In interlinked biographical chapters, the author follows the course of the war from the perspectives of King George III, Prime Minister Lord North, military leaders including General Burgoyne, the Earl of Sandwich, and others who, for the most part, led ably and even brilliantly. Victories were frequent, and in fact the British conquered every American city at some stage of the Revolutionary War. Yet roiling political complexities at home, combined with the fervency of the fighting Americans, proved fatal to the British war effort. The book concludes with a penetrating assessment of the years after Yorktown, when the British achieved victories against the French and Spanish, thereby keeping intact what remained of the British Empire. “A remarkable book about an important but curiously underappreciated subject: the British side of the American Revolution. With meticulous scholarship and an eloquent writing style, O'Shaughnessy gives us a fresh and compelling view of a critical aspect of the struggle that changed the world.”—Jon Meacham, author of Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power
History

Britain and the Seventy Years War, 1744-1815

Britain and the Seventy Years War, 1744-1815

Author: Anthony Page

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781137474438

Category: History

Page: 295

View: 429

Eighteenth-century Britons were frequently anxious about the threat of invasion, military weakness, possible financial collapse and potential revolution. Anthony Page argues that between 1744 and 1815, Britain fought a 'Seventy Years War' with France. This invaluable study: - Argues for a new periodization of eighteenth-century British history, and explains the politics and course of Anglo-French war - Explores Britain's 'fiscal-naval' state and its role in the expansion of empire and industrial revolution - Highlights links between war, Enlightenment and the evolution of modern British culture and politics Synthesizing recent research on political, military, economic, social and cultural history, Page demonstrates how Anglo-French war influenced the revolutionary era and helped to shape the first age of global imperialism.
Biography & Autobiography

Cornwallis

Cornwallis

Author: Richard Middleton

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300265507

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 720

The first biography of Charles Cornwallis in forty years—the soldier, governor, and statesman whose career covered America, India, Britain, and Ireland Charles, First Marquis of Cornwallis (1738–1805), was a leading figure in late eighteenth-century Britain. His career spanned the American War of Independence, Irish Union, the French Revolutionary Wars, and the building of the Second British Empire in India—and he has long been associated with the unacceptable face of Britain’s colonial past. In this vivid new biography, Richard Middleton shows that this portrait is far from accurate. Cornwallis emerges as a reformer who had deep empathy for those under his authority, and was clear about his obligation to govern justly. He sought to protect the population of Bengal with a constitution of written laws, insisted on Catholic emancipation in Ireland, and recognized the limitations of British power after the American war. Middleton reveals how Cornwallis’ rewarding of merit, search for economy, and elimination of corruption helped improve the machinery of British government into the nineteenth century.
History

Captives of Liberty

Captives of Liberty

Author: T. Cole Jones

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812296556

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 695

Contrary to popular belief, the American Revolutionary War was not a limited and restrained struggle for political self-determination. From the onset of hostilities, British authorities viewed their American foes as traitors to be punished, and British abuse of American prisoners, both tacitly condoned and at times officially sanctioned, proliferated. Meanwhile, more than seventeen thousand British and allied soldiers fell into American hands during the Revolution. For a fledgling nation that could barely afford to keep an army in the field, the issue of how to manage prisoners of war was daunting. Captives of Liberty examines how America's founding generation grappled with the problems posed by prisoners of war, and how this influenced the wider social and political legacies of the Revolution. When the struggle began, according to T. Cole Jones, revolutionary leadership strove to conduct the war according to the prevailing European customs of military conduct, which emphasized restricting violence to the battlefield and treating prisoners humanely. However, this vision of restrained war did not last long. As the British denied customary protections to their American captives, the revolutionary leadership wasted no time in capitalizing on the prisoners' ordeals for propagandistic purposes. Enraged, ordinary Americans began to demand vengeance, and they viewed British soldiers and their German and Native American auxiliaries as appropriate targets. This cycle of violence spiraled out of control, transforming the struggle for colonial independence into a revolutionary war. In illuminating this history, Jones contends that the violence of the Revolutionary War had a profound impact on the character and consequences of the American Revolution. Captives of Liberty not only provides the first comprehensive analysis of revolutionary American treatment of enemy prisoners but also reveals the relationship between America's political revolution and the war waged to secure it.
History

The Seven Years' War

The Seven Years' War

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004236448

Category: History

Page: 644

View: 215

In The Seven Years’ War: Global Views, Mark H. Danley, Patrick J. Speelman, and sixteen other contributors reach beyond traditional approaches to the conflict. Chapters cover previously-understudied aspects of the war in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Western Hemisphere.
History

The British Are Coming

The British Are Coming

Author: Rick Atkinson

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781627790444

Category: History

Page: 800

View: 282

Winner of the George Washington Prize Winner of the Barbara and David Zalaznick Book Prize in American History Winner of the Excellence in American History Book Award Winner of the Fraunces Tavern Museum Book Award From the bestselling author of the Liberation Trilogy comes the extraordinary first volume of his new trilogy about the American Revolution Rick Atkinson, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning An Army at Dawn and two other superb books about World War II, has long been admired for his deeply researched, stunningly vivid narrative histories. Now he turns his attention to a new war, and in the initial volume of the Revolution Trilogy he recounts the first twenty-one months of America’s violent war for independence. From the battles at Lexington and Concord in spring 1775 to those at Trenton and Princeton in winter 1777, American militiamen and then the ragged Continental Army take on the world’s most formidable fighting force. It is a gripping saga alive with astonishing characters: Henry Knox, the former bookseller with an uncanny understanding of artillery; Nathanael Greene, the blue-eyed bumpkin who becomes a brilliant battle captain; Benjamin Franklin, the self-made man who proves to be the wiliest of diplomats; George Washington, the commander in chief who learns the difficult art of leadership when the war seems all but lost. The story is also told from the British perspective, making the mortal conflict between the redcoats and the rebels all the more compelling. Full of riveting details and untold stories, The British Are Coming is a tale of heroes and knaves, of sacrifice and blunder, of redemption and profound suffering. Rick Atkinson has given stirring new life to the first act of our country’s creation drama.