History

The Prairie West as Promised Land

The Prairie West as Promised Land

Author: R. Douglas Francis

Publisher: University of Calgary Press

ISBN: 9781552382301

Category: History

Page: 490

View: 233

Millions of immigrants were attracted to the Canadian West by promotional literature from the government in the late 19th century to the First World War bringing with them visions of opportunity to create a Utopian society or a chance to take control of their own destinies.
Social Science

Second Promised Land

Second Promised Land

Author: Harry H. Hiller

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773576872

Category: Social Science

Page: 568

View: 772

Combining statistical analysis and ethnographic study, Harry Hiller uncovers two waves of in-migration to Alberta. His innovative approach begins with the individual migrant and analyzes the relocation experience from origin to destination. Through interviews with hundreds of migrants, Hiller shows that migration is complex and dynamic, shaped not just by what Alberta offers but also prompted by a process that begins in the region of origin which makes migration possible, and helps determine whether migrants stay or return home. By combining a social psychological approach with structural factors such as Alberta’s transition from a regional hinterland province to its emerging role the global system, discussions of gender, the internet, and folk culture, Second Promised Land provides a multi-dimensional and deeply human account of a contemporary Canadian phenomenon.
History

The Prairie West: Historical Readings

The Prairie West: Historical Readings

Author: R. Douglas Francis

Publisher: University of Alberta

ISBN: 088864227X

Category: History

Page: 776

View: 918

The Prairie West: Historical Readings is a collection of thirty-five articles on Canadian prairie history written by Canada's leading historians, political scientists and economists. This newly expanded and revised edition of The Prairie West will continue to provide a selection of articles, which present both overview interpretation and current research, for use by scholars and students of prairie Canada. The articles are divided into fifteen topics--Interpretations and Historiography; Native People and the Fur Trade; The Métis, The Red River Colony and Canada; The West and Confederation; Indian Treaties and the Establishment of Canadian Law and Order; The Economics of Settlement; Ethnic Groups and Prairie Society; The Settlement Experience and the Creation of Prairie Institutions; Prairie Women; Rural and Agricultural Society of Prairie Canada; Urban Society and Labour in Prairie Canada; Agrarian Reform/Revolt; Prairie Society and Politics in the Great Depression; The Modern West: Politics and Economics; and Literature and Art.
History

Insurgent Democracy

Insurgent Democracy

Author: Michael J. Lansing

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226283647

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 766

In 1915, western farmers mounted one of the most significant challenges to party politics America has seen: the Nonpartisan League, which sought to empower citizens and restrain corporate influence. Before its collapse in the 1920s, the League counted over 250,000 paying members, spread to thirteen states and two Canadian provinces, controlled North Dakota’s state government, and birthed new farmer-labor alliances. Yet today it is all but forgotten, neglected even by scholars. Michael J. Lansing aims to change that. Insurgent Democracy offers a new look at the Nonpartisan League and a new way to understand its rise and fall in the United States and Canada. Lansing argues that, rather than a spasm of populist rage that inevitably burned itself out, the story of the League is in fact an instructive example of how popular movements can create lasting change. Depicting the League as a transnational response to economic inequity, Lansing not only resurrects its story of citizen activism, but also allows us to see its potential to inform contemporary movements.
Law

Farm Workers in Western Canada

Farm Workers in Western Canada

Author: Shirley A. McDonald

Publisher: University of Alberta

ISBN: 9781772122749

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 160

Bill 6, the government of Alberta’s contentious farm workers’ safety legislation, sparked public debate as no other legislation has done in recent years. The Enhanced Protection for Farm and Ranch Workers Act provides a right to work safely and a compensation system for those killed or injured at work, similar to other provinces. In nine essays, contributors to Farm Workers in Western Canada place this legislation in context. They look at the origins, work conditions, and precarious lives of farm workers in terms of larger historical forces such as colonialism, land rights, and racism. They also examine how the rights and privileges of farm workers, including seasonal and temporary foreign workers, conflict with those of their employers, and reveal the barriers many face by being excluded from most statutory employment laws, sometimes in violation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Contributors: Gianna Argento, Bob Barnetson, Michael J. Broadway, Jill Bucklaschuk, Delna Contractor, Darlene A. Dunlop, Brynna Hambly (Takasugi), Zane Hamm, Paul Kennett, Jennifer Koshan, C.F. Andrew Lau, J. Graham Martinelli, Shirley A. McDonald, Robin C. McIntyre, Nelson Medeiros, Kerry Preibisch, Heidi Rolfe, Patricia Tomic, Ricardo Trumper, and Kay Elizabeth Turner.
History

The West and Beyond

The West and Beyond

Author: Sarah Carter

Publisher: Athabasca University Press

ISBN: 9781897425800

Category: History

Page: 462

View: 384

The central aim of "The West and Beyond" is to evaluate and appraise the state of Western Canadian history, to acknowledge and assess the contributions of historians of the past and present, to showcase the research interests of a new generation of scholars, to chart new directions for the future, and stimulate further interrogations of our past.-- The book is broken into five sections and contains articles from both established and new scholars that broadly reflect findings of the conference "The West and Beyond:-- Historians Past, Present and Future" held in Edmonton, Alberta in the summer of 2008.-- The editors hope the collection will encourage dialogue among generations of historians of the West and among practitioners of diverse approaches to the past.-- The collection also reflects a broad range of disciplinary and professional interests suggesting a number of different ways to understand the West.
Social Science

Writing in Dust

Writing in Dust

Author: Jenny Kerber

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 9781554582433

Category: Social Science

Page: 295

View: 495

Writing in Dust is the first sustained study of prairie Canadian literature from an ecocritical perspective. Drawing on recent scholarship in environmental theory and criticism, Jenny Kerber considers the ways in which prairie writers have negotiated processes of ecological and cultural change in the region from the early twentieth century to the present. The book begins by proposing that current environmental problems in the prairie region can be understood by examining the longstanding tendency to describe its diverse terrain in dualistic terms—either as an idyllic natural space or as an irredeemable wasteland. It inquires into the sources of stories that naturalize ecological prosperity and hardship and investigates how such narratives have been deployed from the period of colonial settlement to the present. It then considers the ways in which works by both canonical and more recent writers ranging from Robert Stead, W.O. Mitchell, and Margaret Laurence to Tim Lilburn, Louise Halfe, and Thomas King consistently challenge these dualistic landscape myths, proposing alternatives for the development of more ecologically just and sustainable relationships among people and between humans and their physical environments. Writing in Dust asserts that “reading environmentally” can help us to better understand a host of issues facing prairie inhabitants today, including the environmental impacts of industrial agriculture, resource extraction, climate change, shifting urban–rural demographics, the significance of Indigenous understandings of human–nature relationships, and the complex, often contradictory meanings of eco-cultural metaphors of alien/invasiveness, hybridity, and wildness.
History

Place and Replace

Place and Replace

Author: Esyllt W. Jones

Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press

ISBN: 9780887554315

Category: History

Page: 337

View: 346

Place and Replace is a collection of recent interdisciplinary research into Western Canada that calls attention to the multiple political, social, and cultural labours performed by the concept of ?place.? The book continues a long-standing tradition of situating questions of place at the centre of analyses of Western Canada?s cultures, pasts, and politics, while making clear that place is never stable, universal, or static. The essays here confirm the interests and priorities of Western Canadian scholarship that have emerged over the past forty years and remind us of the importance of Indigenous peoples, dispossession, and colonialism; of migration, race and ethnicity; of gender and women?s experiences; of the impact of the natural and built environment; and the impact of politics and the state. --Publisher's description.
History

The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism

The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism

Author: Edward Cavanagh

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781134828470

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 693

The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism examines the global history of settler colonialism as a distinct mode of domination from ancient times to the present day. It explores the ways in which new polities were established in freshly discovered ‘New Worlds’, and covers the history of many countries, including Australia, New Zealand, Israel, Japan, South Africa, Liberia, Algeria, Canada, and the USA. Chronologically as well as geographically wide-reaching, this volume focuses on an extensive array of topics and regions ranging from settler colonialism in the Neo-Assyrian and Roman empires, to relationships between indigenes and newcomers in New Spain and the early Mexican republic, to the settler-dominated polities of Africa during the twentieth century. Its twenty-nine inter-disciplinary chapters focus on single colonies or on regional developments that straddle the borders of present-day states, on successful settlements that would go on to become powerful settler nations, on failed settler colonies, and on the historiographies of these experiences. Taking a fundamentally international approach to the topic, this book analyses the varied experiences of settler colonialism in countries around the world. With a synthesizing yet original introduction, this is a landmark contribution to the emerging field of settler colonial studies and will be a valuable resource for anyone interested in the global history of imperialism and colonialism.
Business & Economics

The Bar U & Canadian Ranching History

The Bar U & Canadian Ranching History

Author: S. M. Evans

Publisher: University of Calgary Press

ISBN: 9781552381342

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 413

View: 728

For much of its 130-year history, the Bar U Ranch can claim to have been one of the most famous ranches in Canada. Its reputation is firmly based on the historical role that the ranch has played, its size and longevity, and its association with some of the remarkable people who have helped develop the cattle business and build the Canadian West. The long history of the ranch allows the evolution of the cattle business to be traced and can be seen in three distinct historical periods based on the eras of the individuals who owned and managed the ranch. These colourful figures, beginning with Fred Stimson, then George Lane, and finally Pat Burns, have left an indelible mark on the Bar U as well as Canadian ranching history. The Bar U and Canadian Ranching History is a fascinating story that integrates the history of ranching in Alberta with larger issues of ranch historiography in the American and Canadian West and contributes greatly to the overall understanding of ranching history.
Medical

Managing Madness

Managing Madness

Author: Erika Dyck

Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press

ISBN: 9780887555350

Category: Medical

Page:

View: 117

The Saskatchewan Mental Hospital at Weyburn has played a significant role in the history of psychiatric services, mental health research, and providing care in the community. Its history provides a window to the changing nature of mental health services over the 20th century. Built in 1921, Saskatchewan Mental Hospital was considered the last asylum in North America and the largest facility of its kind in the British Commonwealth. A decade later the Canadian Committee for Mental Hygiene cited it as one of the worst facilities in the country, largely due to extreme overcrowding. In the 1950s the Saskatchewan Mental Hospital again attracted international attention for engaging in controversial therapeutic interventions, including treatments using LSD. In the 1960s, sweeping healthcare reforms took hold in the province and mental health institutions underwent dramatic changes as they began transferring patients into communities. As the patient and staff population shrunk, the once palatial building fell into disrepair, the asylum’s expansive farmland went out of cultivation, and mental health services folded into a complicated web of social and correctional services. Erika Dyck’s "Managing Madness" examines an institution that housed people we struggle to understand, help, or even try to change.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Visual Environmental Communication

Visual Environmental Communication

Author: Anders Hansen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317621379

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 184

View: 844

In 2008, the editors published a well-cited journal paper arguing that while scholarly work on media representations of environmental issues had made substantial progress in textual analysis there had been much less work on visual representations. This is surprising given the increasingly visual nature of media and communication, and in light of emerging evidence that the environment is visualized through the use of increasingly symbolic and iconic images. Addressing these matters, this volume marks out the present state of the field and contains chapters that represent fresh and exciting high quality scholarly work now emerging on visual environmental communication. These include a range of fascinating and often alarming topics which draw on a variety of methods and forms of visual communication. The book demonstrates that research needs to think much more widely about what we mean by the ‘visual’ which plays a massive yet under-researched role in the politics and ideology of public understanding and misunderstanding of and the environment and environmental problems. The book is of relevance to students and researchers in media and communication studies, cultural studies, film and visual studies, geography, sociology, politics and other disciplines with an interest in the politics of visual environmental communication. This book was published as a special issue of Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture.