Publishers' Weekly

Publishers' Weekly

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Publisher:

ISBN: BSB:BSB11359091

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Page: 754

View: 821

The Publisher's Weekly American Book-Trade Journal

The Publisher's Weekly American Book-Trade Journal

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Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:555031912

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View: 678

American literature

The Publishers Weekly

The Publishers Weekly

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Publisher:

ISBN: UCSD:31822036518009

Category: American literature

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View: 735

American literature

Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly

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Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X000022307

Category: American literature

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View: 324

Performing Arts

Paul McPharlin and the Puppet Theater

Paul McPharlin and the Puppet Theater

Author: Ryan Howard

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786424337

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 941

"This extensively researched work on McPharlin and puppetry takes the reader through McPharlin's childhood, his education in New York, his puppeteering years, his service in World War II, and his death in 1948"--Provided by publisher.
Social Science

Reluctant Capitalists

Reluctant Capitalists

Author: Laura J. Miller

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226525921

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 847

Over the past half-century, bookselling, like many retail industries, has evolved from an arena dominated by independent bookstores to one in which chain stores have significant market share. And as in other areas of retail, this transformation has often been a less-than-smooth process. This has been especially pronounced in bookselling, argues Laura J. Miller, because more than most other consumer goods, books are the focus of passionate debate. What drives that debate? And why do so many people believe that bookselling should be immune to questions of profit? In Reluctant Capitalists, Miller looks at a century of book retailing, demonstrating that the independent/chain dynamic is not entirely new. It began one hundred years ago when department stores began selling books, continued through the 1960s with the emergence of national chain stores, and exploded with the formation of “superstores” in the 1990s. The advent of the Internet has further spurred tremendous changes in how booksellers approach their business. All of these changes have met resistance from book professionals and readers who believe that the book business should somehow be “above” market forces and instead embrace more noble priorities. Miller uses interviews with bookstore customers and members of the book industry to explain why books evoke such distinct and heated reactions. She reveals why customers have such fierce loyalty to certain bookstores and why they identify so strongly with different types of books. In the process, she also teases out the meanings of retailing and consumption in American culture at large, underscoring her point that any type of consumer behavior is inevitably political, with consequences for communities as well as commercial institutions.
Comics & Graphic Novels

Dramacon manga volume 3

Dramacon manga volume 3

Author:

Publisher: TOKYOPOP

ISBN: 9781427860859

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 216

View: 646

College students Christie and Bethany are back to pimp their comic at the LAC, this time to a delightfully large crowd of loyal fans who read it online. Bethany's glowing with pride since her mascot art won the contest and is now on every t-shirt and program at the con. They are the stars this year!
Social Science

Religion and the Culture of Print in Modern America

Religion and the Culture of Print in Modern America

Author: Charles L. Cohen

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299225735

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 426

Mingling God and Mammon, piety and polemics, and prescriptions for this world and the next, modern Americans have created a culture of print that is vibrantly religious. From America’s beginnings, the printed word has played a central role in articulating, propagating, defending, critiquing, and sometimes attacking religious belief. In the last two centuries the United States has become both the leading producer and consumer of print and one of the most identifiably religious nations on earth. Print in every form has helped religious groups come to grips with modernity as they construct their identities. In turn, publishers have profited by swelling their lists with spiritual advice books and scriptures formatted so as to attract every conceivable niche market. Religion and the Culture of Print in Modern America explores how a variety of print media—religious tracts, newsletters, cartoons, pamphlets, self-help books, mass-market paperbacks, and editions of the Bible from the King James Version to contemporary “Bible-zines”—have shaped and been shaped by experiences of faith since the Civil War. Edited by Charles L. Cohen and Paul S. Boyer, whose comprehensive historical essays provide a broad overview to the topic, this book is the first on the history of religious print culture in modern America and a well-timed entry into the increasingly prominent contemporary debate over the role of religion in American public life. Best Books for General Audiences, selected by the American Association of School Librarians, and Best Books for Regional Special Interests, selected by the Public Library Association
History

A History of the Book in America, 5-volume Omnibus E-book

A History of the Book in America, 5-volume Omnibus E-book

Author: David D. Hall

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469628967

Category: History

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View: 399

The five volumes in A History of the Book in America offer a sweeping chronicle of our country's print production and culture from colonial times to the end of the twentieth century. This interdisciplinary, collaborative work of scholarship examines the book trades as they have developed and spread throughout the United States; provides a history of U.S. literary cultures; investigates the practice of reading and, more broadly, the uses of literacy; and links literary culture with larger themes in American history. Now available for the first time, this complete Omnibus ebook contains all 5 volumes of this landmark work. Volume 1 The Colonial Book in the Atlantic World Edited by Hugh Amory and David D. Hall 664 pp., 51 illus. Volume 2 An Extensive Republic: Print, Culture, and Society in the New Nation, 1790-1840 Edited by Robert A. Gross and Mary Kelley 712 pp., 66 illus. Volume 3 The Industrial Book, 1840-1880 Edited by Scott E. Casper, Jeffrey D. Groves, Stephen W. Nissenbaum, and Michael Winship 560 pp., 43 illus. Volume 4 Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940 Edited by Carl F. Kaestle and Janice A. Radway 688 pp., 74 illus. Volume 5 The Enduring Book: Print Culture in Postwar America Edited by David Paul Nord, Joan Shelley Rubin, and Michael Schudson 632 pp., 95 illus.
Business & Economics

Handbook of American Business History: Extractives, manufacturing, and services

Handbook of American Business History: Extractives, manufacturing, and services

Author: David O. Whitten

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313251991

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 523

View: 546

Part of a series which aims to supplement current bibliographic materials pertaining to business history.
Social Science

Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All-American Boyhood

Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All-American Boyhood

Author: Ryan K. Anderson

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 9781610755719

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 140

Gilbert Patten, writing as Burt L. Standish, made a career of generating serialized twenty-thousand-word stories featuring his fictional creation Frank Merriwell, a student athlete at Yale University who inspired others to emulate his example of manly boyhood. Patten and his publisher, Street and Smith, initially had only a general idea about what would constitute Merriwell’s adventures and who would want to read about them when they introduced the hero in the dime novel Tip Top Weekly in 1896, but over the years what took shape was a story line that capitalized on middle-class fears about the insidious influence of modern life on the nation’s boys. Merriwell came to symbolize the Progressive Era debate about how sport and school made boys into men. The saga featured the attractive Merriwell distinguishing between “good” and “bad” girls and focused on his squeaky-clean adventures in physical development and mentorship. By the serial’s conclusion, Merriwell had opened a school for “weak and wayward boys” that made him into a figure who taught readers how to approximate his example. In Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All-American Boyhood, Anderson treats Tip Top Weekly as a historical artifact, supplementing his reading of its text, illustrations, reader letters, and advertisements with his use of editorial correspondence, memoirs, trade journals, and legal documents. Anderson blends social and cultural history, with the history of business, gender, and sport, along with a general examination of childhood and youth in this fascinating study of how a fictional character was used to promote a homogeneous “normal” American boyhood rooted in an assumed pecking order of class, race, and gender.